JAPAN-QUEBEC:日本・ケベック情報

To Promote Japan-Quebec Relations by Posting Information about Quebec: カナダ・ケベック州の情報を発信して日本・ケベック関係を促進する

スポンサーサイト

上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。
  1. --/--/--(--) --:--:--|
  2. スポンサー広告

Interview with Mr. Beliveau:べりボー氏とのインタビュー

Interview with Mr. Beliveau:べりボー氏とのインタビュー

Interview Series #6:インタビューシリーズ#6
Mr. Beliveau:べりボー氏 Quebec1.jpg

Interviewee: Mr. Marc Beliveau
Public Relations Officer, Delegation Office of Quebec Government
(Date: January 11, 2007; Place: Shiroyama Trust Tower, Kamiya-cho; Interviewer and Writer: Takahiro Miyao)

Summary of Mr. Beliveau’s Interview

The question “what can Japan learn from Quebec?” is quite interesting. One thing Japan can learn is how to manage a city to make it a “creative city” like Montreal. In some sections of Montreal, there are empty buildings and factories, and a number of artists are moving into those places, because of low rents there and financial support for artists in the city. One result is the emergence of a city of multi-media within Montreal. The key point is how to change functions of some sections of the city to accommodate artists and other people in the so-called “creative class.” By learning from this experience in Montreal, Japan can manage the old sections of its cities to make them more creative than otherwise.

Another thing that Japan can learn from Quebec is how to enrich daily living for city residents. For example, the City of Montreal has a number of empty lots, which are used as community gardens to be rented out to its residents. The City provides some management, but it is loose enough that residents can use them freely as their gardens. In fact, this practice of community gardens has become a kind of movement, now spreading to various parts of the world.
http://www.cityfarmer.org/Montreal13.html
Similarly, “mosaic culture” is a movement, originating in Montreal, where residents can work on some arts such as sculptures in a public place. Actually, this has become a big event, which was held in Shanghai last year, and will be held in Hamamatsu next year.

Community-level exchange from the international perspective is also something Japan can learn from Quebec, where various NGOs are quite active in supporting community affairs in developing countries. For example, Cirque du Soleil, which is based in Montreal, has become a well-known organization worldwide, and it is also committed to community-based volunteer work to help improve welfare in communities overseas. Just recently, it has launched an NGO, named “One Drop,” which will be contributing to the development of water access in Africa.
http://www.cirquedusoleil.com/CirqueDuSoleil/en/showstickets/alegria/TicketsGeneral/barcelona_benefit.htm
On the Japan side, there seem to be interesting community developments such as coop activities among elderly people, and foreign observers are interested in what is happening in Japanese communities. In Japan, however, there are relatively few communities that are open to the outside world. By learning from Quebec, Japan should have more open community developments and interactions.

Finally, multi-cultural, multi-linguistic communities should be more fully developed and utilized in Japan, as in Quebec. While there is a Japanese way of educating its elite class, what is lacking there is a multi-cultural approach to train them to be global leaders. In this respect, Japanese education should become more diverse and liberalized, and more parent involvement needs to be encouraged.
At the same time, Japan should be more open to immigration so that foreign language communities can be integrated into the mainstream of Japanese society. This would benefit both foreigners and Japanese in many ways.
Reference:
Quebec Government Delegation Office:
http://www.mri.gouv.qc.ca/tokyo/fr/politique_internationale/politique_intern.asp

(Interviewer: Takahiro Miyao)
---------------------------------------------------------------
マルク・ベリボー氏とのインタビュー
マルク・べりボー氏:
ケベック州政府在日事務所・広報担当官
(2007年1月11日、東京都港区神谷町、城山トラストタワー、聞き手・文責は宮尾尊弘)

べりボー氏インタビューの要旨

「日本はケベックから何を学べるか」というのは大変興味深い設問である。まず第1に日本が学べるものは、どのように都市を経営したらモントリオールのような「創造的都市」になるのかということではないだろうか。モントリオールでは使われていないビルや工場の建物が放置されている地区があり、そこに芸術家たちが住むようになったが、それはレントが安い上に芸術家たちに対する公的な支援があるからである。その結果、モントリオールの市内にマルチメディアシティが出現した。重要なのは、どのように都市の機能を変えたらいわゆる「創造的階層」といわれる芸術家などをそこに引き付けることができるかとうことである。この点についてモントリオールの経験から学んで、日本も都市の古い地区をより創造的な方向に変えていくことができるのではないだろか。

さらに日本がケベックから学べるものとして、どのようにしたら市民の日常生活をより豊かなものにできるかということがある。例えば、モントリオール市内には数多くの空地があり、それを住民にコミュニティ・ガーデンとして貸与している。もちろん市はその土地の管理はしているが、非常に緩やかな規定なので、事実上住民が自分たちの庭園として自由に使える。実際にこのコミュニティ・ガーデンのアイデアはひとつの運動となって世界各国に広がっている。
http://www.cityfarmer.org/Montreal13.html
同様にモントリオール発の運動としては、「モザイク文化活動」があり、これは市民が公共の広場で彫刻などの芸術作品を作成するというもの。事実、これは大きなイベントに成長し、昨年は上海で行われ、来年には浜松で開催される予定である。

国際的な視野でコミュニティ間の交流を行うということも、日本がケベックから学べることではないだろうか。ケベックではいろいろなNGO団体などが発展途上国のコミュニティの問題について支援活動を行っていることはよく知られている。例えば、モントリオールのシルク・ド・ソレイユは世界的に有名であるが、それはまた海外のコミュニティの福祉を改善するためのボランティア活動を行うことにも熱心である。ごく最近、それは「ワン・ドロップ」というNGO活動を始め、アフリカの水資源開発に対する資金援助を行うことに力を注いでいる。
http://www.cirquedusoleil.com/CirqueDuSoleil/en/showstickets/alegria/TicketsGeneral/barcelona_benefit.htm
日本側でも、高齢者によるコーポラティブ活動など興味深いコミュニティ作りが進んでおり、海外からも日本のコミュニティで起こっていることに注目を示す人たちが増えている。しかし日本の場合、まだ外の世界にオープンなコミュニティが少ないことは残念である。この点についてケベックから学び、日本はもっとオープンなコミュニティ作りと交流を促進してほしい。

最後に日本でもケベックのように、多文化・多言語のコミュニティを育成して活用することに努めるべきである。日本では確かにエリートを教育してはいるようであるが、彼らをグローバル・リーダーになるように訓練するという多文化的なアプローチに欠けている。この点で日本はもっと多様で自由な教育方法をとるべきであるし、また父兄の教育への関与をもっと促進すべきではないだろうか。
それと同時に日本はもっと門戸を開いて移民を受け入れ、外国語を話すコミュニティを日本社会に溶け込ませるような努力をしなければならない。そうすれば日本にいる外国人も日本人もいろいろな分野で利益を享受することができるであろう。
参考:
ケベック州政府在日事務所
http://www.mri.gouv.qc.ca/tokyo/jp/delegation/qui_sommes_nous/mandat.asp

以上(文責:宮尾尊弘)
スポンサーサイト
  1. 2007/01/26(金) 10:26:57|
  2. Interviews
  3. | トラックバック:0
  4. | コメント:0

Prof. Miyao's Lecture@Meiji Univ.:明大での宮尾教授の講義

Prof. Miyao's Lecture@Meiji Univ.:明大での宮尾教授の講義

Lecture on 1/15/2007 20070115203100.jpg

Prof. Takahiro Miyao (International Univ. of Japan) lecturing in "Contemporary Quebec"
「現代ケベック」のコースで講義する宮尾尊弘国際大学GLOCOM教授

"What Can Japan Learn From Quebec?"

On January 15, invited by Prof. Obata, I gave a lecture in his "Contemporary Quebec" course, mainly asking students the following question: What do you think Japan can learn from Quebec?
In the first half of the lecture, the interviews on the Japan-Quebec Blog (http://japanquebec.blog76.fc2.com) were explained, especially focusing on what the interviewees thought Japan could learn from Quebec. And then the students were asked to write down what they themselves think Japan can learn from Quebec and submit it right away.
In the second half, the students' answers were taken up and commented for mutual learning between the lecturer and the students. The following is the number of students identifying each of the fields where Japan can learn most from Quebec:
Cultural policy (14), Education system (8), Language policy (7), Pride/identity (3), Immigration policy (2), Work-life balance (2), PR overseas (1) -- an interesting and illuminating result!

「日本はケベックから何を学べるか」

1月15日に、小畑教授の招待により「現代のケベック」の講座で講義を行なったが、そこで学生たちに「日本はケベックから何を学べると思うか」という問いを投げかけてみた。
前半の講義では、「日本・ケベック情報」のブログ(http://japanquebec.blog76.fc2.com)に掲載したインタビューの内容を説明し、特にインタビューを受けた人が「何を日本がケベックから学べる」と考えているかに焦点を当てた。それから学生たちに、自分達は日本が何をケベックから学べると思うかを書いてもらい、それを講義の途中で回収した。
後半の講義では、その学生たちの答えを取り上げ、議論することで講師と学生がお互いに学べるよう工夫した。以下は、日本がケベックから学ぶところが最も大きいと思われる分野とそれを指摘した学生の合計数のリスト:
文化政策(14)、教育制度(8)、言語政策(7)、誇り・意識(3)、移民政策(2)、ワーク・ライフ・バランス(2)、海外でのPR(1)ーー興味深く示唆に富んだ結果といえる。
  1. 2007/01/15(月) 21:08:28|
  2. Special Events
  3. | トラックバック:0
  4. | コメント:0

Interview with Mr. Ikeuchi:池内氏とのインタビュー

Interview with Mr. Ikeuchi:池内氏とのインタビュー

Interview Series #5:インタビューシリーズ#5
Mr. Ikeuchi: 池内光久氏 Ikeuchi.jpg

Interviewee: Mr. Mitsuhisa Ikeuchi
Executive Advisor, New India Assurance Co., Ltd.
Senior Advisor, Kyoritsu Insurance Brokers of Japan
(Date: January 10, 2007; Place: Kyoritsu Bldg., Nihonbashi; Interviewer/Writer: Takahiro Miyao)

Summary of Mr. Ikeuchi’s Interview

I started traveling to Quebec on business, when I was stationed in Toronto, mainly covering Ontario and Quebec Provinces as Director and General Manager of Tokio Marine Management Ltd. in the deecade of 1980. Since then, I have been interested in Quebec, as I made friends with Mr. Robert Keating and other members of the Delegation Office of Quebec Government in Tokyo, after I returned to Japan.
At the same time, I joined the Japanese Association for Canadian Studies (JACS; http://www.jacs.jp/), and have been doing research on the Quebec economy, especially from the viewpoint of comparison between Quebec and other provinces. Based on my research, I sometimes make presentation at the JACS Conferences and other meetings, and often teach courses on Canada and Quebec at Meiji University and other colleges.

One of the points that I often emphasize in my presentation is as follows. A commonly held belief, particularly among Japanese businesspeople, that “the Quebec economy was adversely affected by the francophone-led cultural policy which facilitated the exodus of anglophone business and human resources to Ontario and other provinces” does not seem to be supported by evidence. The fact is that, owing to such cultural policy in Quebec, many francophone Canadians have regained confidence in themselves and returned to Quebec, especially gathering in and around Montreal, affecting the Quebec economy in a positive way. Actually, various industries such as manufacturing, warehousing, transportation, R&D, etc. have recently been flourishing in satellite cities and towns near Montreal along the national borders, positively contributing to the development of the Quebec economy as a whole.
From Japan’s standpoint, those industries located in the Montreal region, such as aviation-related business, transportation and marine equipment, movie business, 3D animation, and drug research & development, seem to be complimentary with Japanese industries and, therefore, it would be mutually beneficial to interact with each other. This is one of the main differences between Quebec and other Provinces, where their trade with Japan tends to be “unilateral” with natural resources exported to Japan in exchange for consumer electronics, automobiles and various components.

Needless to say, there are a number of problems with Quebec. Just like any other Canadian province, over 80 percent of the Quebec economy still depends on the U.S., however hard they have tried to develop their own business, and social problems seem getting worse, especially among young people, due to the collapse of traditional moral values. As for problems unique to Quebec, population tends to stagnate in Quebec Province, that is the francophone region of Canada, compared to the anglophone region, which is attracting more immigrants. As a result, Montreal has been surpassed by Toronto in terms of population for some time, and could be caught up with by Vancouver in the foreseeable future. Furthermore, there is a problem of widening economic gaps between prosperous Montreal and other cities along the southern borders on one hand and the northern region depending solely on primary industries on the other.
A problem for Japan, rather than for Quebec, is that Quebec and other provinces are trading more with China than with Japan these days, and Chinese imports are becoming more and more visible everywhere in Canada. As a result, Japan’s presence in Quebec or in Canada as a whole, seems to be fading, at least relatively. So, Japan needs to consider how to appeal to Quebec and Canada for that matter in order to maintain and improve the mutual relationship in the future.

In conclusion, there does not seem to be any major problem with the Quebec economy, which should be developing nicely with its originality and uniqueness, due to the abundant supply of excellent human resources. In a sense, that is an intended result of educational policies with emphasis on culture, languages, and arts, which have been adopted since the “Silent Revolution” terminated the old educational system under the control of the Catholic Church in the 1960s.
In this regard, Japan can learn much from the Quebec experience, when it comes to “educational reform.” It is important for Japan to train human resources by emphasizing culture, languages and arts, which have rather been neglected in the past. I myself am teaching at a college in Osaka, using English as the official language on campus, where students are studying hard in response to teachers’ sincere efforts to teach them in the foreign language, promoted by the college as a whole. We can make Japan-Quebec relations better and closer, especially in the educational and cultural fields, for example, through student exchange programs, in the future.
References:
Mitsuhisa Ikeuchi, “My Life in Canada,” 1993
http://bookweb.kinokuniya.co.jp/htm/4882022427.html
Richard Grunberger, “A Social History of the Third Reich” (Originally in German; Japanese translation by Mitsuhisa Ikeuchi), 2000
http://www.junkudo.co.jp/detail2.jsp?ID=0100028415
David Bercuson, “Under the Canadian Flag” (Japanese translation by Mitsuhisa Ikeuchi & Kyoichi Tachikawa), 2003
http://www.sairyuusha.co.jp/archive/2004/04/post_273.html

(Interviewer: Takahiro Miyao)
---------------------------------------------------------------

池内光久氏とのインタビュー
池内光久氏:ニューインディア保険会社日本支店常任顧問、共立インシュアランスブローカーズ(株)シニアアドバイザー
(2007年1月10日、東京日本橋の共立ビルにて、聞き手・文責は宮尾尊弘)

池内氏インタビューの要旨

私がケベックに頻繁に行く機会を持ったのは、1980年代にトロントで東京海上火災の駐在員として主にオンタリオとケベックをカバーしていたときで、その後日本に帰ってからもケベック州政府在日事務所のロバート・キーティング氏などと交流し、ケベックとの関係を深めていった。
それと同時に「日本カナダ学会」(http://www.jacs.jp/)のメンバーとしてケベックの経済に興味を持ち、ケベックと他の州との比較などについて研究を行い、その結果に基づいて学会などで発表し、さらに明治大学やその他の大学でカナダおよびケベックの経済について講義をしている。

そこで私が強調しているのは、主に日本で唱えられている通説である「フランス語を重視する文化政策によって英語を重視する企業や人材がオンタリオやその他の州に移動したためケベック経済が悪影響を受けた」という説は誤りであり、事実はそのような文化政策によって、フランス語を話す人材が自信を取り戻し、その多くがケベック州に戻り、特にモントリオールやその周辺の衛星都市に集まってビジネスを盛り立てたプラスの効果のほうが大きかったということである。実際に国境沿いのいくつかの都市では、製造業、倉庫業、運送業、研究開発などの経済活動が活発化してケベック経済の発展に貢献したといえる。
また日本から見てもモントリオール地域で隆盛を極めている航空産業を始め、輸送・海洋機器、映画関係、三次元動画、さらに薬品関係の研究開発などは、日本の産業と補完的なものが多く、お互いに交流することでメリットの大きい分野が目立っている。これが日本との交易で、資源と家電・自動車・部品などがそれぞれ一方通行という他の州とケベック州とが異なる点といえよう。

もちろんケベックにも問題点は多く、これはカナダ全体の問題でもあるが、いくら独自の産業を育てても、経済の8割以上はお隣の米国に依存している体質が変わらないことや、社会的なモラルが崩れて若者の間で色々な問題が起こっていることが指摘できる。またケベック州に特徴的な問題としては、移民がどうしても英語圏の州に行くケースが多くなることもあり、フランス語圏では人口が伸びずに、モントリオールもトロントに人口規模では追い抜かれて久しいが、そのうちバンクーバーにも追いつかれるのではないかといわれていること。またモントリオールなど国境周辺の地域と北に位置する一次産業中心の地域との「南北格差」が拡大している問題など悩みは多い。
またこれはむしろ日本の問題であるが、最近ではケベックもその他の州も、日本よりは中国との貿易が盛んになり、もっぱら中国からの輸入品が目立つようになってきている。そのために日本の存在感が相対的に薄まってきているので、日本としてはケベックを始め、カナダ全体にどのようにその存在感をアピールして関係を維持改善していくかを考える必要があろう。

結論として、ケベック州の経済の今後にはそれほど問題はなく、これからもその独自性を発揮しつつ経済的にも順調に発展していくであろうし、それを実現するための優秀な人材も豊富である。それは、60年代の「静かな革命」以来、それまでカトリック教会の支配下で遅れていた教育に重点を置き、文化・言語・芸術を重視する政策を一貫して続けたことがここにきて見事に開花しているといえる
この点について、日本が今後「教育改革」を進める際に、ケベックから学ぶべきものが多い。日本でもこれまで比較的軽視されてきた文化・言語・芸術などに重点を置いて人材の育成を図ることが大切である。私も現在、英語を使用言語とする大阪の大学で講師をしているが、外国語の使用を全学的に推進し、教師も熱心に教えれば学生も必死に勉強してそれなりの成果が上がるものである。今後とも教育や文化の面で、例えば学生の交換留学制度などを通じて日本とケベックとの関係をさらに深めていくことが可能であろう。
参考:
池内光久著「カナダ・ライフ」彩流社(1993)
http://bookweb.kinokuniya.co.jp/htm/4882022427.html
池内光久訳(リチャード・グルンベルガー著)「第三帝国の社会史」彩流社(2000)
http://www.junkudo.co.jp/detail2.jsp?ID=0100028415
池内光久・立川京一共訳(デイヴィッド・バーカソン著)「カナダの旗の下で」彩流社(2003)
http://www.sairyuusha.co.jp/archive/2004/04/post_273.html

以上(文責:宮尾尊弘)
  1. 2007/01/14(日) 23:59:54|
  2. Interviews
  3. | トラックバック:0
  4. | コメント:0

FC2Ad

上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。