JAPAN-QUEBEC:日本・ケベック情報

To Promote Japan-Quebec Relations by Posting Information about Quebec: カナダ・ケベック州の情報を発信して日本・ケベック関係を促進する

スポンサーサイト

上記の広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。
新しい記事を書く事で広告が消せます。
  1. --/--/--(--) --:--:--|
  2. スポンサー広告

Interview with Mr. Beliveau:べりボー氏とのインタビュー

Interview with Mr. Beliveau:べりボー氏とのインタビュー

Interview Series #6:インタビューシリーズ#6
Mr. Beliveau:べりボー氏 Quebec1.jpg

Interviewee: Mr. Marc Beliveau
Public Relations Officer, Delegation Office of Quebec Government
(Date: January 11, 2007; Place: Shiroyama Trust Tower, Kamiya-cho; Interviewer and Writer: Takahiro Miyao)

Summary of Mr. Beliveau’s Interview

The question “what can Japan learn from Quebec?” is quite interesting. One thing Japan can learn is how to manage a city to make it a “creative city” like Montreal. In some sections of Montreal, there are empty buildings and factories, and a number of artists are moving into those places, because of low rents there and financial support for artists in the city. One result is the emergence of a city of multi-media within Montreal. The key point is how to change functions of some sections of the city to accommodate artists and other people in the so-called “creative class.” By learning from this experience in Montreal, Japan can manage the old sections of its cities to make them more creative than otherwise.

Another thing that Japan can learn from Quebec is how to enrich daily living for city residents. For example, the City of Montreal has a number of empty lots, which are used as community gardens to be rented out to its residents. The City provides some management, but it is loose enough that residents can use them freely as their gardens. In fact, this practice of community gardens has become a kind of movement, now spreading to various parts of the world.
http://www.cityfarmer.org/Montreal13.html
Similarly, “mosaic culture” is a movement, originating in Montreal, where residents can work on some arts such as sculptures in a public place. Actually, this has become a big event, which was held in Shanghai last year, and will be held in Hamamatsu next year.

Community-level exchange from the international perspective is also something Japan can learn from Quebec, where various NGOs are quite active in supporting community affairs in developing countries. For example, Cirque du Soleil, which is based in Montreal, has become a well-known organization worldwide, and it is also committed to community-based volunteer work to help improve welfare in communities overseas. Just recently, it has launched an NGO, named “One Drop,” which will be contributing to the development of water access in Africa.
http://www.cirquedusoleil.com/CirqueDuSoleil/en/showstickets/alegria/TicketsGeneral/barcelona_benefit.htm
On the Japan side, there seem to be interesting community developments such as coop activities among elderly people, and foreign observers are interested in what is happening in Japanese communities. In Japan, however, there are relatively few communities that are open to the outside world. By learning from Quebec, Japan should have more open community developments and interactions.

Finally, multi-cultural, multi-linguistic communities should be more fully developed and utilized in Japan, as in Quebec. While there is a Japanese way of educating its elite class, what is lacking there is a multi-cultural approach to train them to be global leaders. In this respect, Japanese education should become more diverse and liberalized, and more parent involvement needs to be encouraged.
At the same time, Japan should be more open to immigration so that foreign language communities can be integrated into the mainstream of Japanese society. This would benefit both foreigners and Japanese in many ways.
Reference:
Quebec Government Delegation Office:
http://www.mri.gouv.qc.ca/tokyo/fr/politique_internationale/politique_intern.asp

(Interviewer: Takahiro Miyao)
---------------------------------------------------------------
マルク・ベリボー氏とのインタビュー
マルク・べりボー氏:
ケベック州政府在日事務所・広報担当官
(2007年1月11日、東京都港区神谷町、城山トラストタワー、聞き手・文責は宮尾尊弘)

べりボー氏インタビューの要旨

「日本はケベックから何を学べるか」というのは大変興味深い設問である。まず第1に日本が学べるものは、どのように都市を経営したらモントリオールのような「創造的都市」になるのかということではないだろうか。モントリオールでは使われていないビルや工場の建物が放置されている地区があり、そこに芸術家たちが住むようになったが、それはレントが安い上に芸術家たちに対する公的な支援があるからである。その結果、モントリオールの市内にマルチメディアシティが出現した。重要なのは、どのように都市の機能を変えたらいわゆる「創造的階層」といわれる芸術家などをそこに引き付けることができるかとうことである。この点についてモントリオールの経験から学んで、日本も都市の古い地区をより創造的な方向に変えていくことができるのではないだろか。

さらに日本がケベックから学べるものとして、どのようにしたら市民の日常生活をより豊かなものにできるかということがある。例えば、モントリオール市内には数多くの空地があり、それを住民にコミュニティ・ガーデンとして貸与している。もちろん市はその土地の管理はしているが、非常に緩やかな規定なので、事実上住民が自分たちの庭園として自由に使える。実際にこのコミュニティ・ガーデンのアイデアはひとつの運動となって世界各国に広がっている。
http://www.cityfarmer.org/Montreal13.html
同様にモントリオール発の運動としては、「モザイク文化活動」があり、これは市民が公共の広場で彫刻などの芸術作品を作成するというもの。事実、これは大きなイベントに成長し、昨年は上海で行われ、来年には浜松で開催される予定である。

国際的な視野でコミュニティ間の交流を行うということも、日本がケベックから学べることではないだろうか。ケベックではいろいろなNGO団体などが発展途上国のコミュニティの問題について支援活動を行っていることはよく知られている。例えば、モントリオールのシルク・ド・ソレイユは世界的に有名であるが、それはまた海外のコミュニティの福祉を改善するためのボランティア活動を行うことにも熱心である。ごく最近、それは「ワン・ドロップ」というNGO活動を始め、アフリカの水資源開発に対する資金援助を行うことに力を注いでいる。
http://www.cirquedusoleil.com/CirqueDuSoleil/en/showstickets/alegria/TicketsGeneral/barcelona_benefit.htm
日本側でも、高齢者によるコーポラティブ活動など興味深いコミュニティ作りが進んでおり、海外からも日本のコミュニティで起こっていることに注目を示す人たちが増えている。しかし日本の場合、まだ外の世界にオープンなコミュニティが少ないことは残念である。この点についてケベックから学び、日本はもっとオープンなコミュニティ作りと交流を促進してほしい。

最後に日本でもケベックのように、多文化・多言語のコミュニティを育成して活用することに努めるべきである。日本では確かにエリートを教育してはいるようであるが、彼らをグローバル・リーダーになるように訓練するという多文化的なアプローチに欠けている。この点で日本はもっと多様で自由な教育方法をとるべきであるし、また父兄の教育への関与をもっと促進すべきではないだろうか。
それと同時に日本はもっと門戸を開いて移民を受け入れ、外国語を話すコミュニティを日本社会に溶け込ませるような努力をしなければならない。そうすれば日本にいる外国人も日本人もいろいろな分野で利益を享受することができるであろう。
参考:
ケベック州政府在日事務所
http://www.mri.gouv.qc.ca/tokyo/jp/delegation/qui_sommes_nous/mandat.asp

以上(文責:宮尾尊弘)
スポンサーサイト
  1. 2007/01/26(金) 10:26:57|
  2. Interviews
  3. | トラックバック:0
  4. | コメント:0

コメント

コメントの投稿


管理者にだけ表示を許可する

トラックバック

トラックバックURLはこちら
http://japanquebec.blog76.fc2.com/tb.php/10-b127173a
この記事にトラックバックする(FC2ブログユーザー)

FC2Ad

上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。